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Causes and Risk Factors of Acute Bronchitis

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1 Causes and Risk Factors of Acute Bronchitis on Tue Aug 02, 2016 12:58 pm

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Acute bronchitis is a very common respiratory disease that generates symptoms such as mucus-producing cough, chest discomfort and pain, difficult and shallow breathing, wheezing and fever. One of the most commonly diagnosed respiratory diseases in the United States, acute bronchitis is responsible for causing an estimated 2.5 million new cases of breathing insufficiency each year. Although it has the highest incidence in people with ages over 50, acute bronchitis can be seen in young adults and children as well.


There is a Wide Range of Factors that can Lead to the Occurrence of Acute Bronchitis

The most common cause of acute bronchitis information and prevention with viruses. The viral organisms responsible for triggering the manifestations of acute bronchitis are: adenovirus, influenza virus, parainfluenza virus, coronavirus, coxsackievirus, enterovirus, rhinovirus and respiratory syncytial virus. Commonly developed by children, viral forms of acute bronchitis are usually less serious and generate milder symptoms (mild to moderate fever, non-severe cough and less pronounced obstruction of the airways). Rolling Eyes

Acute Bronchitis can Also be the Consequence of Bacterial Infections

Common bacterial agents responsible for causing acute bronchitis are: Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Bordatella pertussis, Bordatella parapertussis and Branhamella catarrhalis. In some cases, the disease can also be triggered by mycoplasmas, infectious organisms that share the characteristics of both viruses and bacteria. When acute bronchitis is caused by infection with mycoplasmas, the disease is usually severe, has a rapid onset and generates very pronounced symptoms. Some forms of mycoplasma bronchitis can even be life-threatening. Common atypical bacterial agents (mycoplasmas) responsible for causing acute bronchitis are: Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydia pneumoniae and Legionella. Did you ever believe that there was so much to learn about Causes asthmatic bronchitis? Neither did we! Once we got to write this article, it seemed to be endless.


Bronchitis (Acute)





Sometimes, acute bronchitis can also be caused by infection with fungal organisms such as Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis, Blastomyces dermatitidis, Histoplasma capsulatum and Coccidioides immitis. When acute bronchitis is the result of bronchial infection with fungal elements, the disease is generally less serious and generates mild to moderate symptoms. We worked as diligently as an owl in producing this composition on Bronchial Infection. So only if you do read it, and appreciate its contents will we feel our efforts haven't gone in vain.

Non-infectious factors that can lead to the occurrence of acute bronchitis are: dust, pollen, chemicals, pollutants, cigarette smoke, substances with strong, irritant odor (alcohol, paints, benzene). When acute bronchitis is solely the result of exposure to non-infectious irritant agents, the disease is usually less severe and generates mild to moderate symptoms. In this case, the medical treatment is focused towards alleviating the clinical manifestations of the disease. Patients are usually prescribed bronchodilators or cough suppressants for decongestion of the airways and rapid symptomatic relief. Go ahead and read this article on Bronchitis Common. We would also appreciate it if you could give us an analysis on it for us to make any needed changes to it.

Acute bronchitis refers to inflammation of the bronchial mucosal membranes, triggered by various external irritant or infectious agents. Due to prolonged exposure to irritants, pollutants or due to infection with viruses or bacteria, the bronchial region becomes inflamed, resulting in overproduction and expectoration of mucus. Mucus is a substance produced by the soft tissues and membranes involved in breathing. It has a very important role in protecting the respiratory tract against irritants and infectious organisms. However, in the case of acute bronchitis, overproduction of mucus is an inflammatory reaction of the respiratory tract due to irritation of the bronchia. An excessive production of mucus leads to obstruction of the airways, causing wheezing and shallow, accelerated, difficult breathing.

Juniper berries have long been used as a flavoring in foods and alcoholic beverages such as gin. Gin's original preparation was used for kidney ailments. Immature berries are green, taking 2 to 3 years to ripen to a purplish blue-black. The active component is a volatile oil, which is 0.2% to 3.4% of the berry. The best described effect is diuresis, caused by terpinene-4-01, which results from a direct irritation to the kidney, leading to increased glomerular filtration rate. Juniper berries are available as ripe berry, also called berry-like cones or mature female cones, fresh or dried, and as powder, tea, tincture, oil, or liquid extract.



  • Inform patient that urine may turn purplish with higher doses of juniper.
  • Tell patient to avoid applying juniper to large ulcers or wounds because local irritation (burning, blistering, redness, and edema) may occur.



Research Summary

Juniper may have some benefit in diabetic treatment, but further study is necessary. Juniper has an extensive toxicology profile, and therefore must be used with caution. So after reading what we have mentioned here on Bronchitis, it is up to you to provide your verdict as to what exactly it is that you find fascinating here.

Oil (1:5 in 45% Alcohol):

03 to 2 ml by mouth three times a day Tea (steep 1 teaspoon crushed berries in 5 oz boiling water for 10 minutes, and then strain): three times a day Writing on Asthmatic bronchitis smoking to be a gamble to us. This is because there simply seemed to be nothing to write about in the beginning of writing. It was only in the process of writing did we get more and more to write on Treat Bronchitis.

Warn Patient Not to Confuse Juniper With Cade Oil, Which is Derived from Juniper Wood

Advise female patient to report planned or suspected pregnancy before using juniper. There are many varieties of Bronchitis found today. However, we have stuck to the description of only one variety to prevent confusion! Shocked

Juniper berries may be applied topically to treat small wounds and relieve muscle and joint pain caused by rheumatism. The fragrance is inhaled as steam to treat bronchitis. The oil is used as a fragrance in many soaps and cosmetics. Juniper berries are the principle flavoring agent in gin, as well as some bitters and liqueurs. Looking for something logical on Bronchitis, we stumbled on the information provided here. Look out for austin presbyterian theological seminary.

Tell patient to notify pharmacist of any herbal and dietary supplements that he's taking when obtaining a new prescription. Advise patient to consult his health care provider before using an herbal preparation because a conventional treatment with proven efficacy may be available. There is a vast ocean of knowledge connected with Treat Bronchitis. What is included here can be considered a fraction of this knowledge!



  • Safety Risk Kidney damage may occur in patients taking juniper for extended periods.
  • This effect may stem from prolonged kidney irritation caused by terpinene-4-ol or by tur pentine oil contamination ofjuniper products. Rolling Eyes



Administration Dried ripe berries: 1 to 2 g by mouth three times a day; maximum 10 g dried berries daily, equaling 20 to 100 mg essential oil Liquid extract (1:1 in 25% alcohol): 2 to 4 ml by mouth three times a day It is only if you find some usage for the matter described here on Bronchitis that we will feel the efforts put in writing on Bronchitis fruitful. So make good usage of it!

Women who are pregnant or breast-feeding should avoid juniper because of its uterine stimulant and abortifacient properties. Juniper shouldn't be used by those with renal insufficiency, inflammatory disorders of the GI tract (such as Crohn's disease), seizure disorders, or known hypersensitivity. It shouldn't be used topically on large ulcers or wounds because it may cause local irritation. Treat Bronchitis are versatile as they are found in all parts and walks of life. It all depends on the way you take it.

Overdose of juniper may cause seizures, tachycardia, hypertension, and renal failure with albuminuria, hematuria, and purplish urine. Monitor blood pressure and potassium, BUN, creatinine, and blood glucose level. We do hope that you find the information here something worth recommending others to read and think about once you complete reading all there is about Bronchitis.

Reported Uses

Juniper berries are used to treat urinary tract infections and kidney stones. They're also used as a carminative and for multiple nonspecific GI tract disorders, including dyspepsia, flatulence, colic, heartburn, anorexia, and inflammatory GI disorders. Treat Bronchitis play a prominent part in this composition. It is with this prominence that we hope people get to know more about Treat Bronchitis.

As a food, maximum flavoring concentrations are 0.01% of the extract or 0.006% of the volatile oil. Other reported effects of juniper include hypoglycemia, hypotension or hypertension, anti-inflammatory and antiseptic effects, and stimulation of uterine activity leading to decreased implantation and increased abortifacient effects.

There may be additive hypoglycemic effects when juniper is combined with other herbs that lower blood glucose level, such as Asian ginseng, dandelion, fenugreek, and Siberian ginseng. Juniper may have additive effects with other herbs causing diuresis, such as cowslip, cucumber, dandelion, and horsetail.

Tincture (1:5 in 45% Alcohol): 1 to 2 Ml by Mouth Three Times a Day

Hazards Adverse reactions to juniper include local irritation and metrorrhagia. When used with antidiabetics such as chlorpropamide, glipizide, and glyburide, hypoglycemic effects may be potentiated. Concomitant use of juniper and anti-hypertensives may interfere with blood pressure. Juniper may potentiate the effects of diuretics such as furosemide, leading to additive hypokalemia. A disulfiram-like reaction could occur because of alcohol content of juniper extract. What we have written here about Treat Bronchitis can be considered to be a unique composition on Treat Bronchitis. Let's hope you appreciate it being unique. Shocked

Eastern washington university alcohol while taking juniper. Recommend that patient seek medical diagnosis before taking juniper. Unadvised use of juniper could worsen urinary problems, bronchitis, GI disorders, and other conditions if medical diagnosis and proper treatment are delayed.

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